Working with Persons with Disabilities in Forced Displacement

Working with Persons with Disabilities in Forced Displacement Developed by the UNHCR to guide staff in developing policies and practices that meet the needs of people with disabilities in forced displacement and protect them from discrimination. The brief report presents an overview of disability and chronic conditions, nondiscrimination and participation as keys to protection, key considerations, and key resources.

Disability Inclusion: Translating Policy into Practice in Humanitarian Action

Disability Inclusion: Translating Policy into Practice in Humanitarian Action. Report from the Women’s Refugee Commission detailing positive practices and ongoing challenges to promote disability inclusion across UNHCR’s and its partners’ work in multiple countries and multiple displacement contexts. The report provides lessons and recommendations for other organizations and the wider humanitarian community on engaging persons with disabilities at all levels of humanitarian work. It draws on consultations with over 700 displaced persons—including persons with disabilities, their families, and humanitarian staff—in eight countries. The report includes key protection concerns of people with disabilities, implementation of UNHCR guidance on disability, and institutionalizing disability inclusion across UNHCR operations. It also includes recommendations for advancing disability inclusion in humanitarian action. Report, factsheets, and discussion tool for fieldworkers available in multiple languages and an “easy read” format.

Developing Welcoming Faith Communities

Developing Welcoming Faith Communities. Toolkit and related factsheets for faith-based communities, religious congregations, and mental health organizations that want to connect people with mental health conditions and their families to congregational life. Collection includes a report on the role of peer providers (individuals with similar lived experience who offer counseling and support) in connecting people with mental health conditions to the spiritual community. Developed by Temple University.

Unitarian Universalist Sanctuary Movement and Locations

Unitarian Universalist Sanctuary Movement and Locations

The Unitarian Universalist Church is part of the growing Sanctuary Movement comprised of faith and immigrant communities seeking to protect and stand with immigrants facing deportation. Members pledge to protect immigrant families who face workplace discrimination or unjust deportation.

The site maintains a list of Unitarian Universalist congregations and organizations that have pledged to support the New Sanctuary Movement and/or are offering Sanctuary. Includes information on how to become a Sanctuary congregation.

New York

The Accompany Project

Muslims, undocumented immigrants, and others who face potential violence while commuting or traveling alone can request a companion from The Accompany Project, which trains New Yorkers “to disrupt violence – particularly against Arab, Muslim and undocumented residents – and to organize for stronger, safer neighborhoods.” Those wishing to request that someone commute or travel with them can contact the Arab American Association of New York (hours, address, and contact information available on website), which to date has more than 8,000 volunteers for the project. The Accompany Project is also soliciting volunteers to assist with bystander training and organizing sessions around the city.

CUNY Citizenship Now!

New York City

CUNY Citizenship Now! provides free, high quality, and confidential immigration law services to help individuals and families on their path to U.S. citizenship. The organization has 40 locations across New York City. Its attorneys and paralegals offer one-on-one consultations to assess participants’ eligibility for legal benefits and assist them in applying when qualified.

The website lists the immigration issues handled by by CUNY Citizenship Now! They include many routine and complex issues apart from employment-related cases such as visas (immigrant or nonimmigrant, including H1B and the like) or employment related adjustment of status, change of status, or extension of status.

At an Immigration Rights Workshop in Queens, NYC Legal Aid attorneys mentioned this organization as an excellent resource for free legal help in an environment where many pro bono legal organizations suddenly have a big backlog.

CUNY Citizenship Now! Is actively soliciting volunteers.

Languages: English, Spanish

Mohawk Valley Resource Center For Refugees

The Mohawk Valley Resource Center for Refugees (MVRCR) assists refugees and immigrants, and individuals with limited English proficiency. MVRCR is partially accredited by the US Department of Justice and thereby authorized to represent clients before US Citizenship and Immigration Services and to complete immigration forms on clients’’ behalf. MVRCR provides advocacy, counseling, information, processing, and referrals for citizenship and immigration issues. It has a refugee resettlement program in Utica that has resettled more than 15,000 individuals in the city since 1981.

The organization also provides interpretation and translation services and training in cultural competency (for interactions involving health care, education, government services, and more).

MVRCR seeks to help its clients achieve independence and self-sufficiency.

Vive Shelter (a Program of Jericho Road)

Vive is a program of Jericho Road Community Health Center, a nonprofit organization with no connection to the U.S. government. Vive provides shelter and assistance to refugees seeking asylum in Canada. The organization assists adults and families who have an anchor relative in Canada, and unaccompanied minors with parental permission but without anchor relatives, in obtaining asylum. Vive schedules appointments and interviews with the Canada Border Services Agency and houses refugees who are waiting for those appointments or interviews.

Vive charges $100 per week, a fee that includes registration, housing, meals, and access to medical care, legal services, and Wi-Fi. For taxi services to and from appointments with Canadian Border services, Vive charges $30 on the day of the appointment or interview.

The website provides a list of suggested documents, contains special information for children, and explains who Canada considers to be an “anchor relative” for purposes of asylum.

Tennessee

Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition

Tennessee Immigrant and Refugee Rights Coalition (TIRRC) is a statewide immigrant and refugee advocacy group that hold citizenship and rights awareness workshops. TIRRC works in local communities to provide integration services for immigrants as well as outreach to community members to build support for new immigrant communities. Citizenship workshops provide practical assistance to eligible individuals. TIRRC also offers programs that promote civic engagement for new citizens. The Coalition also provides a forum to report rights abuses, register vote, and submit Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) applications.

Massachusetts

Ascentria Care Alliance: Services for New Americans

In Massachusetts and New Hampshire, Ascentria provides services to immigrants that include: legal assistance, job training, employment services, and English classes. Additional services are available in each state. They are a local resettlement agency affiliate of Lutheran Social Services.

Cambridge Public Library: Immigrant & Refugees Resources

A resource guide for refugees and immigrants created by Cambridge Public Library. Includes local and national resources in education, language learning, healthcare, and legal services.

The Worcester Refugee Archive at Clark University

The Refugee Archive, located at the Jeanne X. Kasperson Research Library at Clark University, is a repository for materials, knowledge, research, and resources related to Worcester’s refugee and forced migrant communities. It serves to collect published and unpublished materials on the history, resettlement, community health, livelihoods, and material culture–among other things–of individuals, groups, refugee community organizations, and agencies based in and around Worcester. The catalog includes masters theses, journal articles, dissertations, newsletter and news articles, reports, student work, and materials from organizations and agencies.

Worcester Refugee Assistance Project

WRAP is a network of individuals committed to assisting local refugees from Burma achieve sustainable self‐reliance through mentoring, advocacy and providing material support as needed. Services include English Language Assistance, Family/Peer Mentorship, Health Advocacy, Youth Development, Transportation, Driver’s education, After‐school homework/tutoring, Children’s Program, Citizenship Classes, College Prep, and Teen Mentoring.